IWW: In the spotlight

If you had told me I’d be speaking in front of people about my book years ago, I wouldn’t have believed you…and I might have thrown up a little.

And if I had committed to speak then, they would have had to drag me in like this:

No

Even though I did theater in high school, I’ll always had a hard time with crowds. It’s more than being an introvert, it’s an aversion about talking about myself, especially my work.

I’ve met a lot of women who resist talking themselves up, even when it’s appropriate. It’s a pretty hard skill to acquire, and I’m still flabbergasted when people ask me about my work. I still think someone has paid them to be interested.

I pictured my first Q&A would go like this:

questions 1

I have one

nervous

outta here

crap 1

Fortunately, my first talk went worlds better than that. WORLDS. However, if you do meet me and ask me about my work or compliment me, please forgive me if I stammer a bit. After years of practice, I can handle that hair question easier, at least. From airports to restaurants, all over the world, people have always wanted to know if this is my real hair.

Do you have to jump start your brain when someone asks about your work? How about if they ask you about your hair?

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16 thoughts on “IWW: In the spotlight

  1. Okay, so yeah, I have a bit of an issue when it comes to standing in front of people to discuss my writing. Now, catch me in a small group of 1 to 3 and I can talk your head off about writing, my writing ideas, how one series will link with another series and how I’m excited about the other series that has a bit of a Hunger Games influence. But I haven’t been put in the position of having to discuss my writing before a crowd so…glad it worked out well for you πŸ™‚ YAY!

  2. I’ll second that Angela can talk your head off. Still looking for mine. LOL. (My bad, Angela) πŸ™‚

    I don’t get as nervous as I used to get as long as it’s a topic I know well. But I’ll tell you what the hardest thing is for me even today. I get tongue-tied when people say nice things about me. I have to force myself to say thank you and then shut up or I’ll stammer nonsensically for minutes.

  3. I’m sure that you will be great!!! And I dare anyone to try to get up in the middle of your talk (a picture of brawny werewolves in human form, with their arms crossed over their chest goes with that comment).

  4. I share your aversion to speaking to crowds, but I have gotten considerably better over the years. I can speak as in teaching, no problem, because I’m sharing knowledge they want. But talking about myself and my writing has taken some time. It’s funny you mention hair, no matter how I wear it, people comment on it. Just yesterday at a work meeting I attend bi-monthly, I had worn it down and it was commented on. When I wear it in pinned up braids people will stop and ask: “Is that your own hair? Do you braid it yourself?” and so forth. I don’t find it that interesting, but others do obviously. I’m sure you did just fine speaking, we are STRONG women after all!

  5. Nobody ever asks me about my work (or my hair πŸ™‚ ).

    “It’s more than being an introvert, it’s an aversion about talking about myself, especially my work.” This is the key I think, to get past labels like “introvert” and break it down to exactly what you do and don’t like to do.

    For example, I get embarrassed at most types of “self-promotion,” but I have no problem with public speaking. Other people are uncomfortable doing promotion in person but are very comfortable doing it online.

    I talked about that on my blog a while back:
    http://u-town.com/collins/?p=2730

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